Tuesday, 27 April 2010

Undecided UK Voter

I'm finding it hard to decide how to vote in the UK Parliamentary Election on 6 May.


That makes me one of the floating voters the 3 main political parties in England are each hoping to scoop up into their ship. I've followed their leaders' televised debates with interest, but I can't vote for Conservative, Labour or Liberal Democrat party (- order strictly alphabetical, not preferential).


There are no candidatates standing for any of these parties in the constituency in which I live. This is because of the quaint tradition of facilitating the return of The Speaker of the House of Commons (who has to be impartial). If you don't know who this is or what this means, official information is here.


There seem to be 11 candidates standing for the Buckingham Constituency, including some standing for minor parties and several standing as Independent candidates. I will not be voting for those standing for the BNP, Monster Raving Loony party, UKIP or Cut the Deficit Party. Although I'm a Christian I can't support many of the policies of The Christian Party, so I won't vote for their candidate either. That leaves a confusing choice among several independent candidates. I'm still not clear about all their various values, priorities and policies or personal abilities and qualities.


I intend to vote on 6 May, but how?

2 comments:

  1. So does that mean that whoever you vote for, the speaker will remain in post anyway? And if so, what's the point in voting in your constituency? All sounds quite typical of the rather quirky British political system... As if voting isn't hard enough... :)

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  2. Thanks for your question Red. The Speaker (John Bercow)will only remain in post if he is elected by majority vote in his constituency. Another candidate could win and become our Member of Parliament and the House of Commons would have to appoint another person as Speaker. But this would require an extraordinary swing by the local electorate who voted him in with a massive majority at the last election when he stood for the Conservative party. I think I've got that right, but perhaps someone else will clarify this.

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